PREVENTION

                  

DROWNING IS PREVENTABLE !

 

“Drowning is amongst the most preventable of injury related accidents  among children.” (St. Louis Children’s Hospital)

Through education and lessons, some areas of the US have reduced drowning by 80%.   

Use ALL the layers of protection and prevent drowning:

Be S-A-F-E-R  

S - Swim lessons

A - Adult supervision

F - Fencing and barriers

E - Emergency preparedness

R - Regulation Coast Guard Approved life vests

(Inflatable “floaties” and rings will not prevent drowning.)

 S - SWIM LESSONS  

Swim lessons are important but swim lessons never “drown  proof”.

Nor do they remove the need for close and constant supervision

 

  • Swimming classes have been found to reduce the risk of drowning by 88%. (Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 2009)

 

  • Even very young children can be taught to roll over on their backs and float.  Teaching toddlers and preschoolers who are mobile and love exploring how to roll over and float can buy critical time

                     Most child victims had been out of sight for less than 5 minutes

 

  • All people are safer in the water if they know how to jump into water over their head, turn around, tread water, swim 25 yards and exit without using a ladder.


 

A - ADULT SUPERVISION

 

  • Complete and full attention by an adult is the most important way to prevent drowning - that is supervision without texting, checking phone, reading, playing cards or quick errand

 

  • Water Watcher badges are an important way to promote close supervision.

 

  • Lifeguards hired for pool parties  provide additional and experienced supervision.

 

  • Don’t allow anyone - not anyone - to swim alone

F - FENCES (AND ALARMS AND COVERS)

 

  • Fences  on all four sides of a pool.  They should be 4’ high with self–closing and self-latching gates. Furniture that could be used to climb over fences should be moved away from the fence.  Above-ground pools as well as hot tubs and spas should also be fenced and ladders removed when not in use. Inflatable pools should be emptied

 

  • Alarms on doors, particularly those with direct access to a pool provide an alert as do alarms in pools that provide accidental immersion detection

 

  • Covers on pools and spas prevent unsupervised access

 

E - EMERGENCY RESPONSE

 

  • Knowing CPR allows for immediate response in a crucial time period and can make all the difference.  Having a phone nearby to use in case of an emergency. and having rescue equipment (a rescue pole and life rings) at hand are also important

 

 

R - REGULATION LIFE VESTS AND REMINDERS

 

  • Coast Guard approved life vests can prevent  drowning and must always be worn (not carried) when boating.  Inflatable “floaties” are not a protection

  • Reminding care givers and grandparents as well as friends and neighbors of the importance of adult supervision is an important way to prevent drowning