Water watcher

  • Adult Supervision All children should be taught to never go near the water without an adult and no one should swim alone

  • Supervision should be with full attention and zero distractions

  • Do not drink alcohol when supervising

  • Touch supervision should be provided for young children and non-swimmers.  Touch supervision means being in arm’s reach

  • Get a Water Watcher badge and take the  Water Watcher pledge. The person wearing the badge is completely and fully responsible for watching and supervising.  Water Watcher badges should be used even if lifeguards are present. The person who is the Water Watcher commits to full attention, putting aside the phone and  avoiding any distractions. If the Water Watcher needs to do anything else, they give the Water Watcher badge to another person. Water Watcher badges and lanyards are available from Swim On Foundation

  • Supervise children even at public pools with a lifeguard present. “Lifeguards don’t see everything.  Don’t put your child’s life solely in the hands of a lifeguard. Many times the pools are crowded. There’s a lot of noise.  It’s impossible for one person to never take their eyes off of everyone in the pool”

    • The Survival Doctor James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.

  • 19% of drowning deaths involving children occur in public pools with certified lifeguards present

  • Never leave an infant or young child in a tub – not even for a minute, not even  to go get a towel

  • Most deaths of children under age one occur in the bathtub

  • An infant or young child can drown in 1 inch of water

  • If a child is missing, check the pool first

  • When having a pool party, consider hiring a lifeguard Backyard Lifeguards is a St. Louis company that provides trained lifeguards for parties and events

  • Do not have bikes or ride-able toys in the pool area

Any questions or if you have additional information you think could be helpful to this page or drowning prevention in general, please do not hesitate to contact the Swim On Foundation